INTERVIEW: Oberris

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We sat down with melodic death metal band, Oberris, to discuss their humble beginnings, their plans for the future and more.

How did the band settle on the name Oberris?
We voted one a few names and “Oberris” received the most votes.

Growing up, what was the first album that inspired you to play the genre of music you play?

Justin; a. I grew up completely in love with 90’s rock (I grew up in the 90’s). Sure I had a healthy dosing of Metallica and Pantera but Green Day, Candlebox, Nirvana, Bush and the like were my real jam. Then I had to deal with kids in Middle School which gave me reason to be a little angry with the world and by the end of it I had discovered Mudvayne’s new album, L.D. 50. People in metal might scoff at them nowadays, but that album was creative, raw, and downright pissed.

Amir: I was first introduced to Metal in the late 90’s when I was living in the Middle East. I was 8 when I first heard Master of Puppets. I was immediately hooked and couldn’t get enough of the raw and crushing sound of the instruments. Listening to Metal in the Middle East has always been a challenge especially during the 90’s, but I would secretly copy songs from my brother’s playlist and eventually I landed on “The New Order” by Testament. That album had the best solos I’ve heard by that point and I couldn’t help but to want to be like Alex Skolnick then, he’s still one of my guitar heroes right now. ”Trial by Fire” was the song that made the album for me with its airy and spooky into riff along with the raw bass and Chuck’s mean vocals. Man, I still remember having nightmares because of that intro riff as a kid.

Jay: My first Melodic Death metal album was Heartwork by Carcass, but the album that most influences my writing style is Deliver Us by Darkest hour.

When the band played the first show, how did that go and how would you compare it to your performance now?

Having been in bands before we’ve become used to the notion that most band’s first shows aren’t usually too great, but we really did love it. Performing music always has an amazing feeling to it, not to mention we got to open for Exodus and make friends with bands like Yesterday’s Saints. We did, though, see that we had a lot to work on. We’d like to think we’ve made some progress in being a little less stiff and more energetic on stage. We enjoy each show more than the last, and it shows in all of us on stage.

What sets Oberris apart from any other band in the area?

We sound fairly unique among the other locals, and we believe that’s due to the different array of influences we all bring to the table when it comes to writing. We want each person to be heard through their instrument. We try to write what’s right for the song, but from our own perspectives.

Lyrically, what inspires the band?
Life. Not just from anger but from love, sorrow; all sides of things. There’s plenty of ugly in the world to be angry about, and just enough beauty to remind us why we keep going on, so inspiration is never too far.

You recently covered Killswitch Engage at a performance, if you could see any band or artist cover an Oberris song what would you like to see covered and by whom?

The very idea is mind-blowing.  That particular song was my request to the band, and the idea of someone looking up to Oberris like I look up to them literally makes me blush a little. My only hope is that one day we can answer that.

Looking forward to 2016, what are the bands plans?

We’ve released our 3-track debut E.P. “Honored” on 1/27/16 and we plan on promoting the release through shows in our area and in prominent northeastern cities, like Baltimore and Philadelphia. We do however, plan on releasing a full-length album by the end of 2016.

If you could change one thing about your local scene, what would it be?

Urge more people to partake in the local music scene, whether through attending shows, purchasing merch or promotion through social media sites and word of mouth. 



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Founder of RichardThinks and interviewer at CaliberTV.

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